Decrease cellulite by doing the following exercises

We all know what cellulite is: the unsightly dimpled appearance of the skin that is found most on the thighs, buttocks, and on the belly. According to Medical News Today, cellulite can be caused by any of these factors: hormones, genetics, diet and lifestyle factors. In an effort to eliminate cellulite, women have been known to try variety of cellulite creams, heat treatments, injections, and liposuction. While results may be visually apparent, they can be temporary on other times. Proper diet and exercise, however, may be the most healthiest and effective way to improve the appearance of and even eliminate cellulite. Here at NYC Adventure Boot Camp, we are dedicated to a healthy lifestyle not a temporary fix for weight loss.

Attacking cellulite requires a reduction in body fat, junk food and carbohydrates and an increase of protein in the diet and water intake. Exercises that stimulate the lymphatic system and increase circulation should be incorporated into the fitness routine. The lymphatic system is located just below the surface of the skin and is the responsible for fighting disease and infections. Recommended exercises to get the lymphatic system moving again include but not limited walking, jogging, running, jumping jacks and jump rope. These same exercises can improve the performance of the cardiovascular system by increasing blood circulation. For indoor exercises, cardiovascular machines such as the treadmill, stair stepper, rowing machine, stationary exercise bike, and the elliptical machine may be preferred. It is recommended to perform any of these exercises for at least 30 minutes a session between 4-5 days per week to help reduce body fat, increase circulation, and reduce the amount and appearance of cellulite.

Resistance training along with cardiovascular exercise is a great combination when trying to decrease cellulite. In order to lift weights, more oxygen is required in order for the blood to be pumped to the muscles. Lifting free weights whether using weighted machines, resistance bands, or performing body weight exercises are all great examples of resistance training. It is important to focus on major muscle groups when trying to reduce body fat; those include chest, back, core, buttocks and legs. For the chest, the bench press, chest press machine, and push-ups are especially effective. Dumbbell rows, lat pull-downs, and pull-ups work well for the back muscles. The lower body can be targeted with squats, lunges, leg press, and leg extensions.

When in a time crunch, circuit training is the most efficient way to combine cardiovascular exercise and resistance training. A 30-minute workout can begin with a 2 minute cardio warm-up, followed by some active stretching for 2-3 minutes. Then, one set of an upper body resistance exercise (5-10 repetitions) should be performed followed by another cardio exercise. Next, choose a core exercise (5-10 repetitions) and return to a cardio exercise. Finish with a lower body exercise (5-10 repetitions) followed by a cardio exercise and some cool-down stretches.

For those who have suffered injuries or have physical limitations, exercises such as swimming, seated stationary bikes, yoga and Pilates are all effective ways to achieve great results.

In summary, cellulite can be decreased by mixing cardiovascular exercises and resistance training paired with a healthy diet and increased water intake.

If you are in New York City and interested in joining an all woman’s boot camp  please visit NYC ADVENTURE BOOT CAMP, mention that you found us through our blog for and extra 15% off a membership. Come work out like a GIRL!!!

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Fiber makes you thin

Today I want to talk about fiber. I am making a conscious effort to create a well balance diet for me and my family that includes the correct amount of fiber we all need each day.  Besides the commonly known benefit of consuming fiber, its ability to prevent or relieve constipation, fiber can provide other health benefits as well, such as lowering your risk of diabetes and heart disease. The following are a list of some great benefits you can gain by increasing your fiber intake.  

Fiber is commonly classified into two categories: those that don’t dissolve in water (insoluble fiber) and those that do (soluble fiber).

Insoluble fiber. This type of fiber promotes the movement of material through your digestive system and increases stool bulk, so it can be of benefit to those who struggle with constipation or irregular stools. Whole-wheat flour, wheat bran, nuts and many vegetables are good sources of insoluble fiber.

Soluble fiber. This type of fiber dissolves in water to form a gel-like material. It can help lower blood cholesterol and glucose levels. Soluble fiber is found in oats, peas, beans, apples, citrus fruits, carrots, barley and psyllium. 

 

Benefits of a high-fiber diet

Lowers blood cholesterol levels. Soluble fiber found in beans, oats, flaxseed and oat bran may help lower total blood cholesterol levels by lowering low-density lipoprotein, or “bad,” cholesterol levels.

Aids in weight loss. High-fiber foods generally require more chewing time, which gives your body time to register when you’re no longer hungry, so you’re less likely to overeat. Also, a high-fiber diet tends to make a meal feel larger and linger longer, so you stay full for a greater amount of time. And high-fiber diets also tend to be less “energy dense,” which means they have fewer calories for the same volume of food.

Helps control blood sugar levels. Fiber, particularly soluble fiber, can slow the absorption of sugar, which for people with diabetes can help improve blood sugar levels.

Normalizes bowel movements. Dietary fiber increases the weight and size of your stool and softens it.

Helps maintain bowel integrity and health. A high-fiber diet may lower your risk of developing hemorrhoids, and small pouches in your colon.

How much fiber do you need?

The National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine, which provides science-based advice on matters of medicine and health, gives the following daily recommendations for women:

 Age younger than 50

Age older than 50

25

21

   
   

Your best fiber choices: If you aren’t getting enough fiber each day, you may need to boost your intake.

  • Grains and whole-grain products
  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Beans, peas and other legumes
  • Nuts and seeds

Tips for fitting in fiber

Need ideas for high-fiber meals and snacks? Try these suggestions:

Jump-start your day. For breakfast choose a high-fiber breakfast cereal — 5 or more grams of fiber a serving. Opt for cereals with “bran” or “fiber” in the name. Or add a few tablespoons of unprocessed wheat bran to your favorite cereal.

Switch to whole grains. Look for breads that list whole wheat, whole-wheat flour or another whole grain as the first ingredient on the label. Look for a brand with at least 2 grams of dietary fiber a serving. Experiment with brown rice, wild rice, barley, whole-wheat pasta and bulgur.

Bulk up your baked goods. Substitute whole-grain flour for half or all of the white flour when baking. Whole-grain flour is heavier than white flour. In yeast breads, use a bit more yeast or let the dough rise longer. When using baking powder, increase it by 1 teaspoon for every 3 cups of whole-grain flour. Try adding crushed bran cereal or unprocessed wheat bran to muffins, cakes and cookies.

Mix it up. Add pre-cut fresh or frozen vegetables to soups and sauces. For example, mix chopped frozen broccoli into prepared spaghetti sauce or toss fresh baby carrots into stews.

Get a leg up with legumes. Eat more beans, peas and lentils. Add kidney beans to canned soup or a green salad. Or make nachos with refried black beans, lots of fresh veggies, whole-wheat tortilla chips and salsa.

Eat fruit at every meal. Apples, bananas, oranges, pears and berries are good sources of fiber.

Make snacks count. Fresh and dried fruit, raw vegetables, and low-fat popcorn and whole-grain crackers are all good choices. An occasional handful of nuts is also a healthy, high-fiber snack.

One final note, high-fiber foods are good for your health. But adding too much fiber too quickly can promote intestinal gas, abdominal bloating and cramping. Increase fiber in your diet gradually over a period of a few weeks. This allows the natural bacteria in your digestive system to adjust to the change. Also, drink plenty of water. Fiber works best when it absorbs water, making your stool soft and bulky.